Introducing the #DigitalLiteracyManifesto

Help us crowdsource this call-to-action between Social Media Day (#SMDay, June 30, 2020) and Media Literacy Week (October 26-30, 2020) by building out these digital literacy imperatives and adding new imperatives wherever gaps may exist. Contact Garth@Globalisland.ca to contribute to the manifesto.


Digital literacy (aka information literacy or media literacy) is an essential competency for everyone in the 21st century. Canadians have always valued truth, transparency, knowledge, collaboration and communication. Education and awareness campaigns are helping Canadians learn to be critical and well-informed consumers of information, but information publishers can also play a crucial role by promoting digital citizenship and facilitating information and media literacy. We believe that communications professionals in industries, government, nonprofits and the media can help set higher standards for digital literacy in Canada and worldwide by adopting the following five imperatives:

1 Give Technology a Human Voice

Ensure that digital information always speaks with a human voice so it is accessible to all.

2 Uphold Digital Citizenship

Support dialogue and learning about digital literacy so individuals, groups and communities may understand their rights and responsibilities in information sharing.

3 Dethrone Social Media

Design social content to serve people by giving people and communities advanced tools to self-govern their own social media spheres and have more control over the dynamics.

4 Live the Questions Now

Foster critical thinking by providing accurate, reliable and well-crafted information and by helping people know how to ask questions and which questions need to be asked.

5 Authenticate & Orientate

Include human-readable, verifiable context in all digital information including author(s), date published, date modified, geolocation (if related), intended audience(s) and sources.


Globalisland.ca 2020 | Garth von Buchholz

Inline image of Digital Literacy Manifesto

Universal Design Chart

Free Download, Creative Commons Licence

To understand access needs, you also have to understand the barriers. This universal design access chart, compiled from a variety of sources, outlines access needs and potential barriers to consider when developing online content for the web or social media. You can share it under the terms of the specified Creative Commons licence.

The Font of Youth

How to Select a Language for Your Language

We all know that when we use all caps, OUR WORDS SHRIEK. And when we use a script-style font, or even just italics, there is a sense of intimacy, personality and even romance. Serif fonts say art and culture, while sans-serif fonts say business and technology. What fonts do you really like? Hate? Whole websites have been devoted to the hatred of Comic Sans, and a feature-length movie has been made about Helvetica

Content is never neutral as it is always being shaped by design, presentation, context, delivery and other factors. And from the early days of monks who drew lavishly illuminated text to bloggers who write their rants in lean Verdana, the art of typography has literally given us a wealth of languages for our language. 

No doubt fonts are a kind of meta-language. Our choice of fonts for personal correspondence, business writing or website copy tells people something about us. It influences how our content communicates, and it even makes a statement about time and place, the same way wearing skinny ties and stovepipe pants conjures up images of the 1980s.   

Some promising new fonts in the last few years include ITC American Typewriter Pro, ITC Franklin, Carter Sans and Bradley Type, and there’s a list of the top 100 best-selling fonts of all time, updated daily. Vintage fonts are a lot of fun for creating a kind of textual mise-en-scène as it tells a story the instant you see it. Have a look at these free vintage fonts ― Carnivalee Freakshow, Circus Ornate, Showboat and Parisian, to name a few.

The following table lists 12 notable fonts, along with the year they were introduced. Some originated as fonts for print and conventional advertising channels, while others in the ‘90s and later were intended for screen use on computers. BTW, Facebook uses a modified version of the Klavika font.

Think about how your choice of font style for your website or other digital media project may date you and your project. When these fonts were introduced they became popular, and even though most remain in the canon of default fonts found on most machines, they still hearken back to their original era.

chart of historical fonts and their design origins